As a manager, knowing how to consistently and effectively recognize your team can be difficult. For starters, who has the time?! On any given day, managers are planning and evaluating department activities, coaching and counseling employees, defining business objectives, establishing strategic goals, developing policies and procedures, and… you get it. They’re busy and recognition takes time. But dig a little deeper, and you’re likely to find a few less obvious reasons why managers find it difficult to consistently dish out the employee recognition.

In some cases, employers start off with the right intentions when seeking to recognize employee performance, but the perception of sending and receiving recognition can be subjective. In a poll we took of 100 employees and managers, the employees never felt they received as much recognition as managers believed they were giving out.

In other cases, recognition is too generalized. A simple “thank you” doesn’t let the employee know what action they performed, or what core value they lived out that deserved a thanks in the first place. Another common instance seen is not all employees’ like to be recognized in the same way. Some may prefer a shout-out in the company all-hands meetings, while others think a simple, hand-written note is just fine. There are so many employee recognition ideas out there it might be hard to know which one will work best, but remember: recognition is like employee motives— one size does not fit all.

But the fact of the matter is, employees do things everyday that help grow a business and deserves recognition. That’s why you hired them!

To help you quickly identify employee behaviors that are aligned with your core values and business objectives, we created a manager’s guide with 50 common behaviors worth recognizing and rewarding.

Start reinforcing the existing employee behaviors that bring success to your business. Others will take note and your efforts will pay off.

50 behaviors to recognize and reward

Download here!
 

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Darby Dupre
Darby Dupre